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Cultivating innovation and equity in co-production of commercialized spring water in peri-urban Bandung, Indonesia

Anindrya Nastiti
Environmental Management Technology Research Group, The Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, West Java, Indonesia; anindrya@tl.itb.ac.id

Sander V. Meijerink
Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, Nijmegen; s.meijerink@fm.ru.nl

Mark Oelmann
Hochschule Ruhr West, University of Applied Science, Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany; mark.oelmann@hs-ruhrwest.de

A.J.M. Smits
Institute for Science, Innovation, and Society, Radboud University, Nijmegen; and Delta Areas and Resources Applied Research Centre, Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Science, Velp, the Netherlands; a.smits@science.ru.nl

Barti Setiani Muntalif
Environmental Management Technology Research Group, The Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, West Java Indonesia; dwinaroosmini@yahoo.com

Arief Sudradjat
Environmental Management Technology Research Group, The Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, West Java, Indonesia; arief.sudradjat@yahoo.com

Dwina Roosmini
Environmental Management Technology Research Group, The Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, West Java, Indonesia; barti_setiani@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT: This paper examines a co-production arrangement between private actors, households, and community actors occurring within the framework of scheme of commercialised spring water in peri-urban Bandung, Indonesia. We argue that the provision of spring water in Ujungberung District is a form of co-production, characterised by: (1) any one, or the elements, of the service production process being shared; (2) the presence of a fundamental shift in the balance of power between the primary producers and users/communities, and (3) the existence of mutual support and relationship networks, rather than a clearly defined delineation between providers and clients. Actor contributions defined as inputs along the value chain of spring water production were examined. We describe interactions between local private actors and community members in planning, service delivery, and conflict management with respect to disruption of water supplies, free-riding behaviour, and the geographical distribution of services. This paper identifies several institutional innovations that may yield a safer and more affordable water supply and nurture equity in the sense of: (1) improved access to water for the previously unserved people by piped water and boreholes; (2) the opportunity to negotiate from below; and (3) transparency and accountability.

KEYWORDS: Co-production, equity, innovation, water commercialisation, Indonesia