This 'Astonishing water' photos section offers some mystery and/or astonishing water photos that illustrate the diversity of innovative water uses and devices globally. Enjoy our astonishing water world!

 

Astonishing photo 1

Niagara Falls (USA/Canada)

"Until the development of the New York State Reservation Park in 1885, nearly all the shoreline property along the Niagara Gorge and every viewing area of the Falls was privately owned. Following the creation of the Reservation Park, the State of New York continued to entice industrialization with an offer of cheap water power"

See more details at

http://www.niagarafrontier.com/milldistrict.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niagara_Falls_Hydraulic_Power_and_Manufacturing_Company

AP1

Photo credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_well_(condenser)#/media/File:Puits_aerien_knappen_trans_83_00.jpg

 

Astonishing photo 2

Raised beds, Suphan Buri, Thailand

Raised beds are very popular in Southeast-Asia for vegetable and fruit tree crops in hydromorphic soils, most especially in deltas  (see a Mexicain equivalent: chinampas).

Irrigation of crops occurs directly through maintaining the water levels in the ditch but also through sprinklers : where can be source from ? from the ditches of course, through a small floating pump that follows the farmer as he proceeds along the bed…

See the original photo at

https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/48357951542/in/dateposted/

AP2

Photo credit: François Molle/IRD

 

Astonishing photo 3

'Aerial well', Trans en Provence, France

An aerial well is a structure or device that collects the condensation of moisture from air. This idea is actually quite old, as can be seen from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_well_(condenser).  This impressive mega-structure has been designed by Belgium engineer Achille Knapen in 1930. It never worked… but is still there to be seen.

See, in French, ‘Des fontaines sans source’ by A.Gioda

http://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/exl-doc/pleins_textes/pleins_textes_5/b_fdi_31-32/34749.pdf

http://www.transenprovence.info/archives/2015/02/16/31533708.html

AP3

Photo Credit Wikipedia : https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fichier:Puits_aerien_Knappen.jpg

 

Astonishing photo 4

Lobuche, Kumbu Valley, Nepal (5000 m in altitude)

A washing machine on top of the world ! Water is sourced directly from the torrent and electricity is generated by a gas engine.

Original : www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/48914265436/in/dateposted/

AP4

Photo credit : Patrice Garin

 

Astonishing photo 5

Damnoen Saduak area, west of Bangkok

Raised beds can be planted with coconut trees, especially in areas under tidal influence where the average salinity is higher. But harvested nuts have to be hauled out of the beds, which are often connected to the plot's surrounding dyke by a simple plank or bamboo.... Water provides a solution: nuts are cut, thrown into the ditch, assembled in garlands, and finally tugged to the exit of the plot with a minimal effort.

Original à https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/48951433961/in/dateposted/

AP5

Credit photo: Surachit Chirawet

 

Astonishing photo 6

Free lunch

Les poissons qui passent par les dissipateurs d’énergie des déversoirs des barrages le font à leurs risques et périls…

American White Pelicans gather at the base of Pyramid Lake’s Marble Bluff Dam, USA

https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/31415805198/in/dateposted/

AP6

Credit: USBR (US Bureau of Reclamation)

 

Astonishing photo 7

Boat lift at Saint-Louis-Arzviller, northeastern France

Le plan incliné de Saint-Louis-Arzviller is a boat lift which is part of the canal linking the Marne and the Rhine rivers and allos the crossing of the Vosges Mountain range, in northeastern France.

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plan_inclin%C3%A9_de_Saint-Louis-Arzviller

The lift celebrated its 50th anniversary this year (2019)

AP7

Credit : Patrick Giraud 

 

Astonishing photo 8

Created wetlands, California

These are created wetlands, mostly from previously planted agricultural fields.  Most of these are created by the California Department of Fish & Wildlife in collaboration with the Audubon Society, CA Waterfowl Association and Ducks Unlimited to accommodate and encourage winter waterfowl migrants to stop and stay for the season.

Photo with full resolution : https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/45450597871/

See other incredible ‘constructed wetlands’ in California and other exceptional pics by Bruce Barnett

AP8

Credit : Bruce Barnett

 

Astonishing photo 9

Natural cooling ‘system’ near Tengchong, Volcanic park, in Yunnan, China

Keeping fruits and bottles cool thanks to the river

Full resolution version at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/40773128405

Credit : Karen Conniff

AP9

 

Astonishing photo 10

Tea pot at Hammam Meskoutine, Algeria

Last week's astonishing photo showed how to make use of the cooling power of rivers.

Why not do the opposite and prepare… tea, temperature allowing of course!

See full resolution pic at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/49038145303/in/photostream/

AP10

Credit : Eliott MM

 

Astonishing photo 11

Ladybower reservoir plug hole (spillway), UK

Full resolution original: https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/46970323874/

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Credit: Tim Hill

 

Astonishing photo 12

Mobypompe, Burkina Faso

This device allows a motorcycle engine to be used to pump water and, for example, irrigate small areas

Other photos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/48610862283/

AP12

Credit : Bruno Barbier/Cirad

 

Astonishing photo 13

‘Water saving winegrowing’

When saving water is becoming a commercial argument for winegrowers in Chile !

Full resolution original: https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/48693918106/

 AP13

Credit : Sophie Bradford 

 

Astonishing photo 14

Temple pavillon (chozuya), Kyoto, Japon

Shinto water ablution pavilion for a ceremonial purification rite known as temizu, that can be found at the entrance of temples.

Other chozuya

https://www.flickr.com/search/?user_id=143925215%40N04&sort=date-taken-desc&license=2&advanced=1&text=chozuya&view_all=1

Original : https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/44536717955

AP14

Credit : François Molle

 

Astonishing photo 15

Dividing groundwater between users, Yemen

Each right holder has a distinct pipe.

Original photo at : https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/38345251985/

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Credit : Frank van Steenbergen

 

Astonishing photo 16

Irrigated terraces along steep wadi, Yemen

Original at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/36497595280/

AP16

Credit: Jochen Regner

 

Astonishing photo 17

Collecting lotus flowers in a flooded field, Central Thailand

Original at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/24076625297/

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Credit: François Molle

 

Astonishing photo 18

Makeshift swimming pool, Palestine

In the vicinity of BirZeit, a Palestinian father built a swimming pool with plastic sheets in his vegetable garden for the children of the village.

Original at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/28442840289/

AP18

Credit: Heiner Schmitz

 
Astonishing photo 19

Sharing water equitably

Village Water Supply System - Kis - Near Sheki – Azerbaijan

AP19

Credit: Adam Jones @ Flickr/ see Adam's great albums at www.flickr.com/photos/adam_jones/albums

 

Astonishing photo 20

Enjoying curative mineral waters, Madagascar

AP20

Credit: Rod Waddington; see Rod's amazing collection at www.flickr.com/photos/rod_waddington

 

Astonishing photo 21

Terraced paddy-fields, Yunan, China

Whether from China, Vietnam or Philippines, terraced paddy-fields are inevitably irresistible

See our dazzling collection of terraced fields

See original HD at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/43993334710/

AP21

Credit: Isabelle Chauvel

 

Astonishing photo 22

Moving wood on Lake Tana, Ethiopia

No boat needed here. The wood is clustered and floated across the lake.

See original resolution at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/36450196553/

AP22

Credit: François Molle

 

Astonishing photo 23

Bride on boat, Vietnam

The bride is taken to the groom’s house for the wedding ceremony

Presumably he leaves on the other side of the lake

See original resolution at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/30743147047/

AP23

Credit: Quang Nguyen Vinh (on pixabay)

 

Astonishing photo 24

Alluvial fan and spate irrigation in Iran

The art of diverting and sharing water

AP24

Source: NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data from NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Rebecca Lindsey, based on interpretation provided on the ASTER Project Science Imagery Gallery Website. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=36041

 

Astonishing photo 25

Lovely oasis
Huacachina oasis, Ica, Peru

See original resolution at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/45760376022/

AP25

Credit : Willian Justen de Vasconcellos; unsplash

 

Astonishing photo 26

Taum Sauk reservoir failure, USA

An elevated view of the path of the failure and the drained reservoir.
This conspicuous elevated reservoir has been constructed on top of Proffit Mountain to store water pumped out of peak time and to generate electricity during peak times.

See Hydropower Reform Coalition - www.hydroreform.org see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taum_Sauk_Hydroelectric_Power_Station

And original resolution at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/44845821054/

 AP26

Credit: Missouri Attorney General's Office.

 

Astonishing photo 27

Waste from drip irrigation lines, Diama, Senegal

Drip irrigation generates considerable plastic waste, as drip lines have to be replaced between one and five years, according to their quality and local conditions.

Original resolution photo at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/38612487830/

AP27

Credit: Jean-Yves Jamin, Cirad 

 

Astonishing photo 28

People releasing fish to acquire merit, Bangkok

Fish released in water by Buddhist people willing to acquire merit (tham bun), Wat Yaowarat, Bangkok, Thailand.

The slide is used to release fish without harming them.

See original resolution at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/42557203711/

AP28

Credit: François Molle 

 

Astonishing photo 29

Energy dissipating structure after a weir, Japan

Katsu-uri weir on the Kinu River, north of Tokyo

See full resolution original photo at https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/44536694935/

AP29

Credit: François Molle, IRD (and thanks to Dr Satoh)

 
Astonishing photo 30

Nilometer, Cairo

Several nilometers allowed the measure of the flood intensity in the Nile valley. The river communicates with the shaft where the water level can be conveniently read.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nilometer

See the photo with original resolution https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/38588325590/

AP30

Credit: François Molle, IRD

Astonishing photo 31

Seat to cool-down along Karkorum Highway, Pakistan

See the photo with original resolution https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/49013401483/

AP31

Credit: Karen Conniff

 

Astonishing photo 32

Collective water lifting, Chao Phraya Delta, Thailand

Axial pumps powered by 2-wheel tractors are ubiquitous in Thailand.

Here in Lop Buri province farmers congregate in the dry season to suck up water from a main drain.

See the photo with original resolution https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/48611339917/

AP32

Credit: Credit: Khun Somboon, Ban Nong Mon

 

Astonishing photo 33

Water mirrors, Tannourine, northern Lebanon

No large-scale dams in northern Lebanon

Locals develop small-scale reservoirs to allow supllmentary irrigation

See the photo with original resolution  https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/48635835231/

AP33

Credit: Caroline Coulon

 

Astonishing photo 34

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, UK

The aqueduct carries the Llangollen Canal across the valley of the River Dee

See the photo with original resolution  https://www.flickr.com/photos/water_alternatives/45502702884/

AP34

Credit: Martin Clark https://commons.wikimedia.org/